Havasu Falls – Grand Canyon’s Hidden Jewel

Havasu Falls is a waterfall located in the Grand Canyon, Arizona. The water flows out of limestone, which gives it a pleasing blue-green hue, into a series of plunge pools.

By Jeremy Evans – Havasu Falls at NightUploaded by PDTillman, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link

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Shiprock – A unique rock formation in the dusty New Mexico desert

By U.S. Geological Survey – https://www.flickr.com/photos/27784370@N05/14465655209/, CC BY 2.0, Link

Shiprock is an isolated rock rising above the high-desert plain of the Navajo Nation in San Juan County, New Mexico. It is the erosional remnant of the throat of a volcano formed around 30 million years ago,. Governed by the Navajo Nation, the formation plays a significant role in Navajo religion, myth, and tradition. In Navajo called Tsé Bitʼaʼí or “the rock with wings,” myth says that the Shiprock was a piece of land that became a bird, carrying the ancestral people of the Navajo on its back. The name “Shiprock” derives from the peak’s resemblance to an enormous 19th-century clipper ship. Due to recent deaths, littering, and vandalism hiking, filming, and driving are all prohibited to the public due to its sacred nature and its sacred space. It is recommended that the public stay at least three miles (4.8 km) away from the formation and 20 feet (6.1 m) from the lava dikes or wall when visiting.
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Dramatic tufa towers emerge from the surface of Mono Lake

By sam garza from Los Angeles, USA – mono lake serenity, CC BY 2.0, Link

Mono Lake Tufa State Natural Reserve is located near Yosemite National Park within Mono County, in eastern California. The lack of an outlet to the ocean causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. Many columns of limestone rise above the surface of Mono Lake. These limestone towers consist primarily of calcium carbonate minerals. This type of limestone rock is referred to as tufa, which is a term used for limestone that forms in low to moderate temperatures. The tufa originally formed at the bottom of the lake. It took many decades or even centuries to form the well-recognized tufa towers. When lake levels fell, the tufa towers came to rise above the water surface and stand as the majestic pillars seen today.
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Enchanting Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon in Iceland

By Wojciech Strzelecki “Wojtrix” – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Fjaðrárgljúfur is a canyon in south east Iceland. The Fjaðrá river flows through it. The canyon has steep walls and winding water. It is up to 100 m deep and about 2 kilometers long. Its origins date back to the cold periods of the Ice Age, about two million years ago. The canyon was created by progressive erosion by flowing water from glaciers through the rocks and palagonite over millennia. A waterfall flows down the western side of the canyon, visible from an observation platform at the end of a one-mile hike up the eastern edge.
In May 2019, authorities closed the canyon to visitors after it appeared in a music video by Justin Bieber. The resulting stream of visitors threatened to damage the canyon’s environment.
info: wikipedia

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Grand Capucin – A granite tower in the Alps

The Grand Capucin at 3,838 meters is a rock pinnacle in the Mont Blanc Massif in Haute-Savoie, France. The red granite tower is an attractive target for alpine rock climbing.

By ResegunOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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Toxic ‘Siberian Maldives’

The lake near the Siberian city of Novosibirsk with turquoise water and white sandy beaches similar to those in the Maldives is actually a man-made toxic dump and contains the ash that results from burning coal at the nearby thermal power station. After an explosion of interest on social media, the Siberian Generating Company (SGC) warns that people cannot swim in the ash dump. Its water has high alkaline environment. This is due to the fact that calcium salts and other metal oxides are dissolved in it. Skin contact with such water may cause an allergic reaction. Also the bottom of the lake is so muddy that it makes getting out almost impossible. But despite warnings it has remained a popular site for selfies that have gone viral on social networks.

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Hashima, the Battleship Island

By Flickr user: kntrty https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/ – Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/3720075234/, CC BY 2.0, Link

Hashima Island , commonly called Gunkanjima (meaning Battleship Island), is an abandoned island lying about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the city of Nagasaki, in southern Japan. The island’s most notable features are its abandoned concrete buildings, undisturbed except by nature, and the surrounding sea wall. The  island established in 1887 during the industrialization of Japan and was known for its undersea coal mines. In 1974, with the coal reserves nearing depletion, the mine was closed and all of the residents departed soon after,  Interest in the island re-emerged in the 2000s on account of its undisturbed historic ruins, and it gradually became a tourist attraction. Certain collapsed exterior walls have since been restored, and travel to Hashima was re-opened to tourists in  2009. While the island is a symbol of the rapid industrialization of Japan, it is also a reminder of its history as a site of forced labor prior to and during the Second World War.
info: wikipedia
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