Dangerous Roads around the World

Dades Gorge, Morocco
The Dades Gorge, lying in the Atlas Mountains, is beautiful to look at, but not while you’re driving this twisty-turvy road.

Dades Gorge-Moroccoimage source

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Oregon’s ‘Lost Lake’ disappearing through lava tubes

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Oregon is home to the towering Cascades, a range of mountains and active volcanoes. The Lost Lake likely formed about 3,000 years ago, when lava flowing from a volcanic vent blocked a river channel and created the lake. The lake bed begins to fill in the late fall, when the amount of rain coming in starts exceeding the ability of the lava tubes to drain off the water. But during the dry months, the lake vanishes and turns into meadow. The reason? Two hollow lava tubes at the bottom of the lake are constantly draining the lake dry, much like a bathtub left unplugged. It’s not entirely clear where the water goes, but it possibly seeps into the porous subsurface underground. There have been numerous attempts to plug the leak, those endeavors, however, would only result in the lake flooding. Continue reading Oregon’s ‘Lost Lake’ disappearing through lava tubes

Towering Wooden Railroad Bridges from the 19th century

A timber trestle over the Crooked River Gorge in central Oregon sits nearly 320 feet off of the water.

In the 1830s, the railroad boom started a new era in the building of railroad bridges pushing engineers to build incredible bridges with timber trestles that have become synonymous with the era.

Timber trestles were one of the few railroad bridge forms that did not develop in Europe. The reason was that in the United States and Canada cheap lumber was widespread and readily available in nearby forests. The Pacific Northwest of the U.S. and the province of British Columbia, Canada became the central region for hundreds of logging railroads whose bridges were almost all made of timber Howe trusses and trestles.

More info / source: vintag.es

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SUN SHOWERS – when it’s raining and the sun is shining

Setting Sun on Mullach nan Coirean – David Crocker [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A sun shower is a meteorological phenomenon in which rain falls while the sun is shining. A sun shower is usually the result of accompanying winds associated with a rain storm sometimes miles away, blowing the airborne raindrops into an area where there are no clouds.  Sun shower conditions often lead to the appearance of a rainbow, if the sun is at a low enough angle.

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The Sunken Paths of Europe

A sunken lane (also hollow way or holloway) is a road or track that is significantly lower than the land on either side, not formed by the recent engineering of a road cutting but possibly of much greater age.
Various mechanisms have been proposed for how holloways may have been formed, including erosion by water or traffic, the digging of embankments to assist with the herding of livestock, and the digging of double banks to mark the boundaries of estates.
Info source

La Meauffe, France – By Romain Bréget (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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Hiking the Mudflats through the Wadden Sea

Photo credit: Wikimedia

The Wadden Sea is one of the last remaining natural large-scale intertidal ecosystems in the southeastern part of the North Sea. Mudflat hikers are people who, with the aid of a tide table, use a period of low water to walk and wade on the watershed of the mudflats. Belts of this shallow sea lie off the mainland of the Netherlands,  off the coast of northwestern Germany and off the coast of southwest Jutland in Denmark.
In 2009, the Dutch and German parts of the Wadden Sea were inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List and the Danish part was added in June 2014.
See more on WIKIPEDIA
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The stilt-walking shepherds of Landes

In 19th and early 20th century in a region of France called Landes, the roads were non-existent and the ground was marshy and uneven, so the people of Landes – mostly shepherds – developed a unique mode of transportation to allow them to get over the rough ground: they walked on stilts! The stilts of Landes were called, in the language of the country, tchangues, which means”big legs. Mounted on their stilts, the shepherds drove their flocks across the wastes, going through bushes, pools of water, and traversing marshes with safety, without having to seek roads or beaten footpaths. Moreover, this elevation permitted them to easily watch their sheep, which were often scattered over a wide surface. The stilts were pieces of wood about five feet in length, provided with a shoulder and strap to support the foot.
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