Scala dei Turchi: an unusual natural staircase in Sicily

By CarnbySelf-photographed, CC BY 3.0, Link

The Scala dei Turchi (Italian: “Stair of the Turks”) is a rocky cliff coast in southern Sicily, Italy. The Scala is formed by marl, a sedimentary rock with a characteristic white color. It lies between two sandy beaches, and is accessed through a limestone rock formation in the shape of a staircase, hence the name. The latter part of the name derives from the frequent raids carried on by Moors.
info: wikipedia
Continue reading Scala dei Turchi: an unusual natural staircase in Sicily

Advertisements

Gacially carved Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon in Iceland

By Andrés Nieto Porras from Palma de Mallorca, España (Fjaðrárgljúfur) [CC BY-SA 2.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

Fjaðrárgljúfur  is a canyon in south east Iceland about 100 m  deep and about 2 kilometres  long, with the Fjaðrá river flowing through it. The canyon has steep walls and winding water.  It is located near the Ring Road, not far from the village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. The canyon was created by progressive erosion by flowing water from glaciers through the rocks and palagonite over millennia. A waterfall flows down the western side of the canyon, visible from an observation platform at the end of a one-mile hike up the eastern edge.
Continue reading Gacially carved Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon in Iceland

The natural Saturnia Thermal Baths in Tuscany

By © Raimond Spekking / CC BY-SA 4.0 (via Wikimedia Commons), CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

The Terme di Saturnia are a group of springs located a few kilometers from the village of Saturnia in Italy. The springs that feed the baths, which are found in the south-eastern valley, cover a vast territory that stretches from Mount Amiata and the hills of Fiora and Albegna rivers. One legend, according to the Romans, was that the springs were formed by lightning bolts, thrown by Jupiter. The earth split apart to form hot springs that flowed in warm waterfalls.
The sulfurous hot springs, at a temperature of 37.5 °C, are well known for their therapeutic properties, offering relaxation and well being through immersion. The main thermal waterfalls are the Mill Falls – located at an old mill – a series of rock pools that have been turned white by the minerals in the water, which falls in a succession of cascades into the pools.
Continue reading The natural Saturnia Thermal Baths in Tuscany

“Earth Pyramids” – cone-shaped pillars in South Tyrol

By UwelinoOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

The earth pyramids are a natural monument located in South Tyrol. The original name for these earth pyramids is Lahntürme (landslide towers). They are rather unusual formations of their kind which originate from morainic rocks of glacial origin. The columns of the pyramids may be more or less elongated, and the higher they are the thinner they get, ending usually with a stone cover. These earth pyramids are not static, they are constantly evolving, because their life cycle foresees a continuous erosion, or even a final collapse leaving room for new formations.

Continue reading “Earth Pyramids” – cone-shaped pillars in South Tyrol

The Subway in Zion National Park

By God of WarOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

The Subway is a colloquial name for a uniquely shaped slot canyon in Zion National Park in Utah. It is located between two peaks called the North and South Guardian Angels, deep within the Left Fork of North Creek. It is part of the larger Great West Canyon system, which includes both the Left and Right Forks of North Creek.
There are two routes that lead to the Subway. Both are not easy, but one does not require special equipment, while the other can be completed only by experienced hikers. The demanding hike is rewarded with the spectacular sites and an opportunity to freshen up in the Subway’s pools.

Continue reading The Subway in Zion National Park

The Eye Of The Sahara

By NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The Richat Structure,also known as  the “Eye of Africa”, is a prominent circular feature in the Sahara’s Adrar Plateau, in west–central Mauritania. The structure is a deeply eroded  dome with a total diameter of almost 50 km, while the center of concentric rings is 30 km width.  These concentric rings are actually alternating layers of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks that were pushed upward in a symmetrical anticline, geologic dome, from below due to a small incursion of magma.
Continue reading The Eye Of The Sahara

Horseshoe Bend in Arizona

By Joseph Yates josephyates_ (https://unsplash.com/photos/KQNBuD9YGdo) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped incised meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona, in the United States. It is accessible via hiking a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) round trip from U.S. Route 89 and can be viewed from the steep cliff above.
Continue reading Horseshoe Bend in Arizona