Murals of Plants | Mona Caron

A series of paintings of urban weeds by San Francisco-based artist Mona Caron. Her focus is on community-informed and site-specific murals in public space. She has created large-scale murals in the US, Europe, South America and Asia, has delved into stop-motion animation as part of her “WEEDS” project.
In her own words:

I paint all kinds of spontaneous urban vegetation: both invasive and endemic species. Both get eradicated as weeds when they get caught trespassing our enclosures. Yet they come back, always at the front lines, carving a path for the rest of nature to follow.
Weeds break through even the hardest cement, the most seemingly invincible constraints, reconnecting earth to sky, like life to its dreams. It’s happening everywhere at the margins of things, we’re just not paying attention

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Tree Bark Paintings by Wang Yue


Wang Yue, an innovative artist from Shijiazhuang, China, harnesses nature as a canvas for her art. Yue creates paintings of beautiful sceneries on the bare inner layer of tree barks as well as animals looking out from the tree trunks. Wang consulted with the Shijiangzhuang Bureau of Landscape and Forestry to ensure the paints wouldn’t harm the trees. It’s likely summer rains will fade and eventually wash away her artworks.

via ChinaDaily

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Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park

Sunga Park works in South Korea as a mural wallpaper designer. The architectural watercolors selection features buildings from cities around the world, including London, Paris, Busan, Venice, and Oxford. The buildings are painted in a fade out manner that gives them a floating essence and leaves imagination to fill in the rest.

See more on INSTAGRAM

Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG in der Speicherstadt, Hamburg, Deutschland

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Dramatic Finger Paintings by Paolo Troilo

Italian artist Paolo Troilo doesn’t use paint brushes to create these amazing and powerful artworks. Instead of paintbrush he dips his fingertips in black and white paint and guides them across the canvas.