Power-drill becomes a surprising stop-motion tool

Los Angeles-based artist Federico Tobon attached a reel of 24  hand-drawn pages depicting an abstract animal to the chuck of a drill, generating an endlessly spinning sequence of frames. As Tobon engaged the drill’s trigger, the bit rotated the pages 360° and animated the cycle of otherwise static drawings. (via)
See more on Instagram

Waw an Namus – An Oasis in a Volcanic Crater

Waw an Namus, Oasis of Mosquitoes, is a volcanic field, cone and caldera in southern Libya, deep in the Sahara Desert. The inside of the caldera houses an oasis of rich foliage and three small salt lakes of variable color which are the reason for the volcano’s name. A volcanic field of dark basaltic tephra flow extends 10–20 kilometres (6.2–12.4 mi) around the caldera. The dark field’s vast size allows it to be easily seen from space. Due to the fresh water at the volcano, Waw An-Namus was always an important watering point for the caravans.
info: wikipedia

By NASA’s Earth Observatory – The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=86054), CC BY 2.0, Link

Continue reading Waw an Namus – An Oasis in a Volcanic Crater

Eternal Flame Falls

By MpmajewskiOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

The Eternal Flame Falls is a small waterfall located in the Shale Creek Preserve, a section of Chestnut Ridge Park in Western New York. A small grotto at the waterfall’s base emits natural gas, which can be lit to produce a small flame. This flame is visible nearly year round, although it can be extinguished and must occasionally be re-lit.
Continue reading Eternal Flame Falls

Impressive Bulgarian cave with eye-shaped holes in ceiling

image source

Prohodna is a cave in north central Bulgaria, popular tourist attraction for the two eye-like holes in its ceiling that create an eerie effect.  Prohodna is 262 meters (860 ft) long, and has two entrances which lie opposite one another, known respectively as the Small Entrance and the Big Entrance. The cave owes its name, which literally means Thoroughfare Cave or Passage Cave, to this feature.  Prohodna is most notable for the two equal-sized holes in the ceiling of its middle chamber. The holes, formed through erosion, let in light into the cave and are locally known as the Eyes of God or Oknata.
Continue reading Impressive Bulgarian cave with eye-shaped holes in ceiling

The Valley of Balls in Kazakhstan

image source: kazakhstan.orexca.com

Torysh, also known as the “Valley of Balls”, is located close to the town of Shetpe in Western Kazakhstan. The rounded  concretions are 120-180 million years old and their size reaches 4 m in diameter. Geologists do not have a single opinion about the processes that created these mysterious formations. The balls are believed to be concretions —a hard, compact mass formed by the precipitation of minerals. The phenomenon is not rare — examples of such concretions are found all over the globe.
Continue reading The Valley of Balls in Kazakhstan

Spite houses: How to annoy your neighbors

A spite house is a building constructed or modified to irritate neighbors or any party with land stakes. Spite houses may create obstructions, such as blocking out light or blocking access to neighboring buildings or can be just symbols of defiance. Because long-term occupation is at best a secondary consideration, spite houses frequently sport strange and impractical structures.
More info wikipedia
.

In 1806, Thomas McCobb, heir to his father’s land and shipbuilding business, returned home to Phippsburg, Maine, from sea to discover that his stepbrother Mark had inherited the family “Mansion in the Wilderness”. Upset about his loss, McCobb built a house directly across from the McCobb mansion to spite his stepbrother.

By The original uploader was GregManninLB at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Liftarn using CommonsHelper., Public Domain, Link

Continue reading Spite houses: How to annoy your neighbors

Thousands of natural snowballs appear on beach in Siberia

natural-snowballs-siberia-1

Locals in the village of Nyda, in the Gulf of Ob, Siberia say they have never seen anything to compare to them. An 18km stretch of coast was covered in the giant snowballs. The icy spheres are entirely natural. Some are the size of tennis balls. Others almost as large as a basketball.

Spokesman for the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) Sergey Lisenkov said: ‘It is a rare natural phenomenon. When the water in the gulf rose, it came into contact with the frost. The beach began to be covered with ice. Then the water began to slowly retreat, and the ice remained. Its pieces were rolling over in the wet sand, and turned into these balls.’

via

Continue reading Thousands of natural snowballs appear on beach in Siberia