Mind blowing 2D cafe in Korea

YND 223-14 Cafe in western Seoul looks like an optical illusion  in which the tables, chairs, decorations and floor have lost all depth. Even the drinks are served in cups designed to look like they are part of a drawing. The design concept was inspired by a TV show in which the characters are caught partway between the real world and a cartoon existence. A black and white wonder where you can drink coffee and eat fancy treats.

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Posted @tomomi_0421 . 루프탑 오픈했어요🤗 Rooftop has been remodeled and opened recently. Check this out! . – カフェ移転通知 カフェ「YND239-20」はもう営業していません。 カフェを移転し、新しい場所でカフェ「YND223-14」で営業します。 住所:ソウル市麻浦区延南洞223-14(Seongmisan-ro161-10) . – #Cafe연남동239_20 이제 운영하지않아요. #Cafe연남동223_14 여기로 와주세요. We don’t run “Cafe연남동239-20” anymore. Please come to the new cafe-“Cafe연남동223-14” . – Cafe Address ; 223-14 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul . 서울시 마포구 성미산로161-10 (연남동223-14) . – #cafe延南洞223_14 #cafeynd223_14 #홍대카페 #2dcafe #cafe연남동223_14 #연남동카페 #artworkgreem #연남동223_14 #延南洞223_14 #カフェヨンナムドン223_14

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Artistic Water Fountain Sculptures by Malgorzata Chodakowska

My fountains spread the pure joy of life, combining the element of water with the raw material – bronze.” Malgorzata has been sculpting for 30 years. It takes her up to 2-6 months to complete each sculpture.  The creation of this stunning artwork starts by modelling it out of clay. Then to turn it into fountain, the sculptor pours these sculptures into bronze. Finally, water adds the element of motion.

Museum of the Moon

Museum of the Moon is a new touring artwork by UK artist Luke Jerram. Measuring seven meters in diameter, the moon features 120dpi detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface. At an approximate scale of 1:500,000, each centimeter of the internally lit spherical sculpture represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The installation is a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by BAFTA and Ivor Novello award winning composer Dan Jones. Each venue also programs their own series lunar inspired events beneath the moon.

Gems of the ocean: Glass fishing floats

By User:Jgrimmer – Photo taken by original uploader, Public Domain, Link

Glass fishing floats were once used by fishermen in many parts of the world to keep the nets from sinking. Though the floats are often associated with Japan, they were invented in Norway in 1842. Christopher Faye, a Norwegian merchant from Bergen, is credited with their invention and many of them can still be found in local boathouses. From the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s, floats were made of colorful blown glass. These glass floats are no longer used by fishermen, but many of them are still afloat in the world’s oceans, primarily the Pacific.
Although the number of glass floats is decreasing steadily, occasional storms or certain tidal conditions can bring them ashore. They most often end up on the beaches of Alaska, Washington or Oregon in the United States, Taiwan or Canada.
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Night of the Radishes

By AlejandroLinaresGarcia [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons

The Night of the Radishes is an annual event in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico, dedicated to the carving of oversized radishes to create scenes that compete for prizes in various categories. The event has its origins in the colonial period when radishes were introduced by the Spanish. Oaxaca has a long wood carving tradition and farmers began carving radishes into figures as a way to attract customers’ attention at the Christmas market, which was held in the main square on December 23. In 1897, the city created the formal competition. As the city has grown, the city has had to dedicate land to the growing of the radishes used for the event, supervising their growth and distribution to competitors.
info wikipedia
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Incredibly detailed portraits created with millions of tiny ink dots

David Bayo is a French contemporary artist  who creates  portraits made up of dots,  using a technique called stippling. He starts by drawing out the general layout of his portraits, and then proceeds to fill them up with millions of tiny ink dots.

The video below shows Bayo at work.