Folly architecture

In architecture, a folly is a building constructed primarily for decoration, but suggesting through its appearance some other purpose, or of such extravagant appearance that it transcends the range of garden ornaments usually associated with the class of buildings to which it belongs.
18th century English gardens and French landscape gardening often featured mock Roman temples, symbolizing classical virtues. Other 18th century garden follies represented Chinese temples, Egyptian pyramids, ruined abbeys, or Tatar tents, to represent different continents or historical eras.
info: Wikipedia

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire, England

By Saffron BlazeOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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Baltoro Glacier, a river of ice in Pakistan

By Mahnoorrana11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Baltoro Glacier, at 63 km (39 mi) in length, is one of the longest glaciers outside the polar regions. The glacier gives rise to the Shigar River, which is a tributary of the Indus River. It’s located in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, home to some of the world’s highest mountains. The glacier runs through part of the region’s Karakoram mountain range, near a mountain known as K2. The trough of this glacier is very wide. Small valley glaciers form ice falls where they meet the trunk glacier. The sidewalls vary from very steep to precipitous. The glacier has carved striations on the surrounding country rocks. Moving ice has formed depressions, which serve as basins for numerous glacial lakes.

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Crown Shyness – A Phenomenon Where Trees Avoid Touching

Photo: Imgur

Crown shyness (also canopy disengagement) is a phenomenon observed in some tree species, in which the crowns of fully stocked trees do not touch each other, forming a canopy with channel-like gaps. The phenomenon is most prevalent among trees of the same species, but also occurs between trees of different species. There exist many hypotheses as to why crown shyness is an adaptive behavior, and the most prominent theory, is that the gaps prevent the proliferation of invasive insects.

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A fascinating golden bait trap

Russian artist Roman Booteen has created this Hobo nickel, which he titled “THE TRAP with GOLDEN BAIT.” A carved Morgan dollar, featuring a 1945 gold 2-peso coin from Mexico serving as “bait” in the middle. The coin also features a mouth of teeth that act as a trap jaw. The trap jaws are triggered when the gold coin is pressed.

Booteen sells his work on eBay. See more on Instagram.

Photochroms of Norway in late 19th Century

Tvinde Waterfall and hotel

Landscape and marine views of late 19th Century Norway created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the Photochrom process.
Photochrom, invented in the 1880s, is a process for producing colorized images from black-and-white photographic negatives via the direct photographic transfer of a negative onto lithographic printing plates. The process is a photographic variant of chromolithography (color lithography).
Images: Library of Congress

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Power-drill becomes a surprising stop-motion tool

Los Angeles-based artist Federico Tobon attached a reel of 24  hand-drawn pages depicting an abstract animal to the chuck of a drill, generating an endlessly spinning sequence of frames. As Tobon engaged the drill’s trigger, the bit rotated the pages 360° and animated the cycle of otherwise static drawings. (via)
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Waw an Namus – An Oasis in a Volcanic Crater

Waw an Namus, Oasis of Mosquitoes, is a volcanic field, cone and caldera in southern Libya, deep in the Sahara Desert. The inside of the caldera houses an oasis of rich foliage and three small salt lakes of variable color which are the reason for the volcano’s name. A volcanic field of dark basaltic tephra flow extends 10–20 kilometres (6.2–12.4 mi) around the caldera. The dark field’s vast size allows it to be easily seen from space. Due to the fresh water at the volcano, Waw An-Namus was always an important watering point for the caravans.
info: wikipedia

By NASA’s Earth Observatory – The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=86054), CC BY 2.0, Link

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