Brazil’s Little Castle of Horror

By Natalia Naomi Aoi B. – https://www.flickr.com/photos/aoibara/5388278813, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link

Castelinho da Rua Apa is a residential building from the early 20th century, built by the family “Dos Reis” in 1912, having as a mold the French castles. In addition to its historical and cultural value, the Castelinho is known to have harbored a family tragedy in 1937, in which all the residents – mother and two children – were found shot dead and to this day it is unknown who was responsible – which makes  Castelinho a  mysterious haunted place. After the family tragedy the property was left without heirs passing to the patrimony of the Federal Government.
In 1996, the non-governmental organization Club de Mães do Brasil was granted the rights to use Castelinho da Rua Apa. Maria Eulina dos Reis Hilsenbeck is the founder and president of the Club and has been using the space ever since. Little Castle’s restoration was completed in April 2017, and now operates as a social assistance business, providing help to the homeless and chemical dependents in Sao Paulo.
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The stilt-walking shepherds of Landes

In 19th and early 20th century in a region of France called Landes, the roads were non-existent and the ground was marshy and uneven, so the people of Landes – mostly shepherds – developed a unique mode of transportation to allow them to get over the rough ground: they walked on stilts! The stilts of Landes were called, in the language of the country, tchangues, which means”big legs. Mounted on their stilts, the shepherds drove their flocks across the wastes, going through bushes, pools of water, and traversing marshes with safety, without having to seek roads or beaten footpaths. Moreover, this elevation permitted them to easily watch their sheep, which were often scattered over a wide surface. The stilts were pieces of wood about five feet in length, provided with a shoulder and strap to support the foot.
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Photochroms of Norway in late 19th Century

Tvinde Waterfall and hotel

Landscape and marine views of late 19th Century Norway created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the Photochrom process.
Photochrom, invented in the 1880s, is a process for producing colorized images from black-and-white photographic negatives via the direct photographic transfer of a negative onto lithographic printing plates. The process is a photographic variant of chromolithography (color lithography).
Images: Library of Congress

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Victorian Bathing Machines

bathing-machines-2photo credit: Vintage.es

The bathing machine was a device, popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, to allow people to change out of their usual clothes, change into swimwear, and wade in the ocean at beaches. They resembled wooden changing booths, with wheels and wooden steps that led inside. The bathing machine was part of etiquette for sea-bathing more rigorously enforced upon women than men but to be observed by both sexes among those who wished to be proper.

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Early 20th Century Hydrocycles

vintage-hydrocycles-1

A water cycle is a bicycle-like watercraft that makes it possible for us move on water using our own legs. In the late 1890s this invention got the name hydrocycle. To move forward, riders use a crank with pedals just as on a bicycle. The power the rider then puts into the pedals will be shifted to the water or the air via a propeller. For the bike to float on the water, pontoons or surfboards are used.
In 1914, a race was organized on Lake Enghien, north of Paris. The competitors took part with their homemade bicycles and tricycle contraptions with a variety of modifications
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Images:  French National Library via EUROPEANA
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