Enchanting Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon in Iceland

By Wojciech Strzelecki “Wojtrix” – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Fjaðrárgljúfur is a canyon in south east Iceland. The Fjaðrá river flows through it. The canyon has steep walls and winding water. It is up to 100 m deep and about 2 kilometers long. Its origins date back to the cold periods of the Ice Age, about two million years ago. The canyon was created by progressive erosion by flowing water from glaciers through the rocks and palagonite over millennia. A waterfall flows down the western side of the canyon, visible from an observation platform at the end of a one-mile hike up the eastern edge.
In May 2019, authorities closed the canyon to visitors after it appeared in a music video by Justin Bieber. The resulting stream of visitors threatened to damage the canyon’s environment.
info: wikipedia

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Grand Capucin – A granite tower in the Alps

The Grand Capucin at 3,838 meters is a rock pinnacle in the Mont Blanc Massif in Haute-Savoie, France. The red granite tower is an attractive target for alpine rock climbing.

By ResegunOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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Toxic ‘Siberian Maldives’

The lake near the Siberian city of Novosibirsk with turquoise water and white sandy beaches similar to those in the Maldives is actually a man-made toxic dump and contains the ash that results from burning coal at the nearby thermal power station. After an explosion of interest on social media, the Siberian Generating Company (SGC) warns that people cannot swim in the ash dump. Its water has high alkaline environment. This is due to the fact that calcium salts and other metal oxides are dissolved in it. Skin contact with such water may cause an allergic reaction. Also the bottom of the lake is so muddy that it makes getting out almost impossible. But despite warnings it has remained a popular site for selfies that have gone viral on social networks.

είναι

noun: εκτάριο

Mount fanjing – a combination of Buddhish culture and natural beauty

The Mount Fanjing, located in Tongren, Guizhou province, is the highest peak of the Wuling Mountains in southwestern China. It has been a sacred site for Buddhists since the Tang Dynasty and several temples have been built in the area.  Atop Red Cloud Golden Peak, a thumb-like peak, sit two of these temples. There is a steep vertical ascent of 100 meters to the top The Temple of the Buddha and Maitreya Temple are separated by a narrow gorge that visitors can cross via a short bridge. The Mount Fanjing is described by Unesco as an “island of metamorphic rock in a sea of karst”

By Mande5255881Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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Grand Falls: Arizona’s Chocolate Waterfalls

By Philkon Phil Konstantin – Own work, Public Domain, Link

Grand Falls , known for its extremely muddy flow, is a natural waterfall system located in Arizona in the Painted Desert on the Navajo Nation. At 185 feet (56 meters) tall, it is taller than Niagara Falls. It dumps snow melt or monsoon rain into the Little Colorado River below.  Grand Falls was formed when lava from nearby Merriam Crater flowed into the Little Colorado River, creating a lava dam. The river was forced to reroute itself around the dam and Grand Falls formed where the river rejoins its original course.
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Le Mont-Saint-Michel rocky tidal island

By Ryan R ZhaoOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Le Mont-Saint-Michel is an island  in Normandy, France. The original site was founded by an Irish hermit.  The island has held strategic fortifications since ancient times and since the 8th century  has been the seat of the monastery from which it draws its name. Most of the time it is surrounded by vast sandbanks and becomes an island only when the tides are very high. Before the construction of the 3,000-foot causeway that connects the island to land, it was particularly difficult to reach because of quicksand and very fast-rising tides.
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Hashima, the Battleship Island

By Flickr user: kntrty https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/ – Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/3720075234/, CC BY 2.0, Link

Hashima Island , commonly called Gunkanjima (meaning Battleship Island), is an abandoned island lying about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the city of Nagasaki, in southern Japan. The island’s most notable features are its abandoned concrete buildings, undisturbed except by nature, and the surrounding sea wall. The  island established in 1887 during the industrialization of Japan and was known for its undersea coal mines. In 1974, with the coal reserves nearing depletion, the mine was closed and all of the residents departed soon after,  Interest in the island re-emerged in the 2000s on account of its undisturbed historic ruins, and it gradually became a tourist attraction. Certain collapsed exterior walls have since been restored, and travel to Hashima was re-opened to tourists in  2009. While the island is a symbol of the rapid industrialization of Japan, it is also a reminder of its history as a site of forced labor prior to and during the Second World War.
info: wikipedia
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