The hidden medieval town of Monemvasia

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Monemvasia is located on a small island off the east coast of the Peloponnese in Greece. The island is linked to the mainland by a short causeway 200m in length. Its area consists mostly of a large plateau some 100 meters above sea level, the site of a powerful medieval fortress. The town walls and many Byzantine churches remain from the medieval period. The medieval buildings have been restored, and many of them converted to hotels.
Monemvasia’s nickname is the Gibraltar of the East or The Rock. The island of Monemvasia was separated from the mainland by an earthquake in 375 AD.

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Bozouls – a French village perched on the edge of tall cliffs

The Trou de Bozouls is a horseshoe shaped gorge, 400 m in diameter and more than 100 m deep, located on the territory of the commune of Bozouls, in Aveyron, France. This encircled meander has been dug by the erosive action of the current waters of Dourdou in the secondary limestones of Causse Comtal. The unique geography of the area came about 2 million years ago when glaciers advanced and receded. Humans have built settlements in the area for thousands of years, using the limestone rock to create their dwellings.

Photo credit: Mairie-bozouls/Wikimedia

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Guelta d’Archei – an oasis in the Sahara desert

Dario Menasce at the English language Wikipedia [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Guelta d’Archei is probably the most famous guelta – a lower level of height  ground between rocks which holds water – in the Sahara. It is a barren place located in the Ennedi Plateau, in north-eastern Chad .The reservoirs of this wetland is supported by groundwater. The guelta  is  a watering place for camels. and it is also inhabited by a very small number of the Nile crocodile.
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The Tiny Fairy Doors of Ann Arbor

fairy-doors-ann-arbor-2Photo credit: bagaball/Flickr

The Fairy Doors of Ann Arbor are a series of tiny doors that are a type of installation art found in the city of Ann Arbor in the U.S. state of Michigan. The first public fairy door appeared outside Sweetwaters Coffee and Tea in 2005, installed by Jonathan B. Wright, a teacher of graphic design technologies. There are ten public Ann Arbor fairy doors, but the idea has also spread to other nearby towns.
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Rakotzbrücke Devil’s Bridge

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Rakotzbrücke (also called the Devil’s Bridge) is nestled in Azalea and Rhododendron Park, Kromlau, Germany. The bridge dates back to 1860s. Rakotzbrücke was specially built to create a circle when it is reflected in the waters beneath it – a popular photo opp. The bridge’s artificially-formed basalt columns were specially shipped from distant quarries.
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Beautifully trimmed trees and hedges at Schönbrunn Garden

trees-hedges-schonbrunn-garden-1photo credit: Reddit

Schönbrunn Palace, one of Europe’s most impressive Baroque palaces, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the top tourist attractions in Vienna.  The park at Schönbrunn Palace was opened to the public around 1779 and since then has provided a popular recreational amenity for the Viennese population as well as being a focus of great cultural and historical interest for international visitors. Especially the long walkways between artfully trimmedtrees  and hedges are really impressive.
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