The Twisted Trees of Slope Point

trees-Slope-Point-4Image credit

Slope Point is the southernmost point of the South Island of New Zealand. The area is frequently knocked with strong and chilling winds from Antarctica. Consequently, trees there grow leaning toward the north. The land around Slope Point is used for sheep farming and it remains uninhabited by humans. The distorted mini-forest was planted to serve as a shelter for the sheep.

Advertisements

The Kaieteur Falls

Kaieteur Falls is a waterfall on the Potaro River in Kaieteur National Park, Guyana. The world’s largest single drop water falls measuring 741 feet. For comparison, Kaieteur is about five times taller than Niagara falls.

Kaieteur-Falls-2Image source

Continue reading The Kaieteur Falls

Inca Salt Ponds

Salineras de Maras, or Inca salt pans located in the Peruvian Andes.
Since pre-Inca times, salt has been obtained in Maras, Peru, by evaporating salty water from a local subterranean stream. The highly salty water emerges at a spring. The flow is directed into an intricate system of tiny channels constructed so that the water runs gradually down onto the several hundred ancient terraced ponds. Almost all the ponds are less than four meters square in area, and none exceeds thirty centimeters in depth. All are necessarily shaped into polygons with the flow of water carefully controlled and monitored by the workers.

Inca-salt-ponds-10image source

Continue reading Inca Salt Ponds

The Swing at the End of the World

swing-end-of-the-world -ecuador-cliff-1

There’s a swing on the edge of a cliff in Ecuador. It has no safety measures and is called the ‘Swing at the End of the World’. It’s a tourist attraction and in order to get there, you have to hike up the path to Bellavista from Banos, until you reach a viewpoint and a seismic monitoring station named La Casa del Árbol (The Tree-house).

Continue reading The Swing at the End of the World

Photography: Wildlife Crossings

Wildlife crossings are structures that allow animals to cross human-made barriers safely. They may include: underpass tunnels, viaducts, and overpasses (mainly for large or herd-type animals), fish ladders and green roofs (for butterflies and birds). Wildlife crossings are a practice in habitat conservation, allowing connections or re-connections between habitats, combating habitat fragmentation. They also assist in avoiding collisions between vehicles and animals, which in addition to killing or injuring wildlife may cause injury to humans and property damage.

Wildlife Overpass, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada. (Image source)

Continue reading Photography: Wildlife Crossings

Hanging Temples in China

MianShan is a fantastic mountain in China noted for its natural scenery, and especially for its cultural and religious relics. Buddhist and Taoist temples are literally built on the cliff face with hundreds of hidden caves, dating back 2500 years. Mian Shan is about 200 km south of TaiYuan, the provincial capital of ShanXi. The most famous of all the Taoist temple is the DaLuo Gong.

Continue reading Hanging Temples in China

Where two rivers meet

The confluence of the rivers Czâlin (clean water) and Yangtze River (brown waters) in Chongqing, China.

In geography, a confluence is the meeting of two or more bodies of water. It refers either to the point where a tributary joins a larger river, called the main stem, or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name. The confluences in the photos below create dramatic visual contrasts.
Continue reading Where two rivers meet