The Yangtze River

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Yangtze River is the largest in China and the third largest in the world with a length of 3,915 miles. Stretching from a land of remote mountains and arid plains in Tibet, it winds its way through canyon gorges to fertile regions of connecting lakes and waterways. The Yangtze’s gorges are the highlights on the river’s course. And of course there is the Three Gorges Dam, the largest dam and hydroelectric power plant in the world.

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Fenghuang – the chinese town that time forgot

Fenhuang is an old town in Hunan province, China, with a history spanning 1,300 years, and architecture dating back to the Ming and Qing dynasties. It is well-known for its stilt houses, folk culture, ethnic groups and fantastic landscape. The town is placed in a mountain setting, incorporating the natural flow of water into city layout. Fenghuang means Phoenix in Chinese language and it represents good omen and longevity in Chinese mythology.

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Pink Lakes

pink-lake-4Lake Retba in Senegal (image source)

These pink lakes are a natural phenomenon, the result of certain algae found in sea salt fields. When the temperature is high enough and adequate light conditions are provided, the algae-rich waters will turn  rose pink and sometimes, even red.

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The Glowing Horsetail Fall in Yosemite National Park

Horsetail Fall, located in Yosemite National Park in California, is a seasonal waterfall that flows in the winter and early spring. The fall occurs on the east side of El Capitan. If Horsetail Fall is flowing in February and the weather conditions are just right, the setting sun illuminates the waterfall, making it glow orange and red. When that happens, the waterfall will glow orange for about 10 minutes. This natural phenomenon is often referred to as the “Firefall”.

By Wcwoolf (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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Norwegian architecture taken out of fairy tales

Borgund Stave Church

It was built sometime between 1180 and 1250 AD with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards or staves. The four corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting on a stone foundation. The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall. (image source)

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