Incredible ice shards pile up along Lake Michigan shorelines

During the winter, 56% of the Lake Michigan was frozen as temperatures reached negative 23 degrees Fahrenheit. As the frozen lake started melting, water underneath the ice pushed broken pieces of ice against one another and  up to the surface transforming the region into a magical wonderland.

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Lake Baikal – The world’s oldest and deepest lake

Lake Baikal, meaning, in Mongolian, “the Nature Lake”, is a rift lake located in southern Siberia, Russia. It’s at least 20 million years old, and roughly a mile deep at its lowest point. The Siberian lake is the largest freshwater lake by volume in the world and is considered the world’s oldest lake. The lake is completely surrounded by mountains and is fed by as many as 330 inflowing rivers. During ice season, that starts usually in mid-January and lasts till mid-April., ice depth increases up to 140 centimeters, that allows quite safe vehicle driving on ice cover. The ice itself is very picturesque because of transparency of 1 meter depth, having different patterns of crevasses and bubbles, performing astonishing sounds.

By Артём ПолозOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link
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The needle-like landscape in Tsingy National Park, Madagascar

CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Tsingy de Bemaraha is a national park located near the western coast of Madagascar. The area is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to the unique geography, preserved mangrove forests, and wild bird and lemur populations. The northern end of the park is characterized by needle-shaped limestone formations, above cliffs over the Manambolo River. The incredibly sharp limestone formations can cut through equipment and flesh easily, which makes traversing them extremely difficult. The word “Tsingy” is derived from a local word meaning “the place where one cannot walk barefoot”.
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Hells of Beppu – Hot springs in Japan for viewing rather than bathing

By 663highlandOwn work, CC BY 2.5, Link

The Hells of Beppu are eight spectacular hot springs  in the Onsen town of Beppu in Japan. The site  is a popular tourist area where you can feel the pulse and the power of the Earth. The “hells”, that are for viewing rather than bathing, are the second largest source of thermal spring water on the planet after Yellowstone park in USA.

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Ball’s Pyramid – A giant sea stack in the Pacific Ocean

By patrickkavanagh, CC BY 2.0, Link

Ball’s Pyramid is a remnant of a shield volcano and caldera that formed about 6.4 million years ago. It lies 20 kilometres (12 mi) southeast of Lord Howe Island in the Pacific Ocean. Rising 562 metres (1,844 ft) out of the water, makes it the tallest volcanic stack in the world. The pyramid is named after Royal Navy Lieutenant Henry Lidgbird Ball, who reported discovering it in 1788.
The sea stack is an iconic climbing destinations and home to insects that were once thought to be extinct.
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Bigar Waterfall

image source: PEXELS

Located in the Anina Mountains on the Mini River Bigăr is one of the most unusual waterfalls in the world and one of the most beautiful in Romania. According to The World Geography, there are a number of facts that place her as number one on the list of eight unique waterfalls around the world due to the way the water spreads and falls in tiny shreds of water.
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Hawa Mahal – The Palace of the Winds

By Marcin BiałekOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Hawa Mahal (in English : “Palace of Winds” or “Palace of the Breeze”) is a palace in Jaipur, India. The red and pink sandstone from which it is built gives Jaipur its nickname, “The Pink City.”
The structure was built in 1799. Its unique five-story exterior is akin to the honeycomb of a beehive with its 953 small windows called jharokhas decorated with intricate latticework. The original intent of the lattice design was to allow royal ladies to observe everyday life and festivals celebrated in the street below without being seen, since they had to obey the strict rules of “purdah”, which forbade them from appearing in public without face coverings. This architectural feature also allowed cool air from the Venturi effect (doctor breeze) to pass through, thus making the whole area more pleasant during the high temperatures in summer. Many people see the Hawa Mahal from the street view and think it is the front of the palace, but in reality it is the back of that structure.

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