Leshan Giant Buddha bridge – One of China’s most beautiful bridges

The Haoshang bridge is part of the Mount Emei Scenic Area, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that includes the world’s largest Buddha. The elegant bridge links the Giant Buddha of Leshan to temples on a nearby island. Sichuan, China. The pedestrian bridge is a type of moon bridge.

Min Zhou, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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Meghalaya: The Rainiest spot on Earth

Meghalaya meaning “abode of clouds” is a state in northeastern India. The state with the wettest areas in the southern Khasi Hills recording an average of 12,000 mm (470 in) of rain a year is the wettest place on earth. Meghalaya is mountainous, with stretches of valley, highland plateaus and many rivers. About 70 percent of the state is forested. The outdoor workers often wear water-proof suits made from bamboo and banana leaf.

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Dawki River – Madhumita Das, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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Photographer creates stunning optical illusion images using the sunset

Sulabh Lamba from India has captured a series of impressive photographs using the sunset The images, were taken in Goliaka, Haryana.

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Karijini National Park

Karijini National Park is centred in Western Australia. The park’s wildlife includes red kangaroos, rock-wallabies, geckos, goannas, bats, legless lizards and a large variety of birds and snakes, including pythons. The park is most notable for its many gorges containing slot canyons, waterfalls and water holes with visitors sometimes swimming in the cold pools of water.

Brian W. Schaller, FAL, via Wikimedia Commons – Joffre Gorge Falls
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The Hanging Lake

Hanging Lake in Colorado. Early tales of the discovery of the lake tell of a man searching for gold in the canyon. The man found a dead horse at the opening of a gulch (the possible origin of the name of Dead Horse Gulch). When he followed the gulch up through the steep hillside through the canyon he came around the back side of the lake. This is how he first saw the small bowl-like basin hanging onto the cliffs below.

Joshuahicks, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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Hall of Mosses

The Hall of Mosses is a loop trail through a portion of the Hoh National Rainforest, Washington. A lush, atmospheric forest of moss-covered trees and ferns.

2 Brandon Kuschel, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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Fairy Pools on Isle of Skye

Located at the foot of the Cuillin Mountains, the Fairy Pools are a natural waterfall phenomenon in Glen Brittle on the Isle of Skye. The pools are a vivid aqua blue and are a popular place for wild swimmers who brave the frigid waters.
The habitat of the Fairy Pools hosts a variety of animals and a large number of birds. The physical landscape is predominately rocky, with some boggy areas here and there. The water in the area is typically cold, as the pools are fed by mountain streams. The pools look as though they were pulled from the imagination of J.R.R. Tolkien.

Wojtek Szkutnik, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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Colorful swirling patterns in Russia’s sylvinite mines

Colorful swirling patterns in Russia’s Uralkali sylvinite mines. Layers of carnallite — a mineral used in fertilizers — band the tunnel walls, producing these vibrant masterpieces. The breathtaking motifs only came to light after photographer Viktor Lyagushkin decided to share his images.
Viktor said: “If you ask me about my strongest impression, my mind was blown with the fact that the miners created this wonderful underground realm and they did not know that.
“Of course, their main task was to win the ore, and it turned out they created the most beautiful place of work and had no idea they did that.”

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Banaue Rice Terraces – The “Eighth Wonder of the World”

The Banaue Rice Terraces are terraces that were carved into the mountains of Banaue, Ifugao, in the Philippines, by the ancestors of the indigenous people. The terraces are often called the “Eighth Wonder of the World”. It is commonly thought that the terraces were built with minimal equipment, largely by hand. The terraces are located approximately 1,500 meters (4,900 feet) above sea level. These are fed by an ancient irrigation system from the rainforests above the terraces. It is said that if the steps were put end to end, it would encircle half of the globe. The building of the rice terraces entails constructing retaining walls with stones and rammed earth which are designed to draw water from a main irrigation canal above the terrace clusters. The rice terraces have helped to create a landscape of great beauty that expresses the harmony between the people and the environment.
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Cabajar, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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