The Kalaloch Tree of Life appears to defy the laws of gravity

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Along the beach located near Kalaloch Lodge in Olympic National Park, Washington, thrives a tree with its root system exposed to the coastal elements. The tree that has been referred to as The Tree of Life aka Root Tree Cave,
wins its battle with gravity hanging on by it roots over a slowly eroding cave along the bluffs of the Pacific Coast.
The tree has entirely exposed roots that aren’t anchored to the ground cliff slowly eroding over time. The cave under the tree was caused by a small stream that empties into the ocean.

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A Plant That Resurrects Itself

By Nicole-Koehler [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Selaginella lepidophylla, also known as (false) rose of Jericho and resurrection plant, is a species of desert plant, native to the Chihuahuan Desert of the United States and Mexico, noted for its ability to survive almost complete dehydration. During dry weather, its stems curl into a tight ball and uncurl only when exposed to moisture. The plant is sold as a novelty item as a bare root in its dry state. It can be revived with only a little water. After wetting, the plant turns green.
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The Root Bridges of Cherrapunji, India

(Flickr: A double decker living bridge) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Cherrapunji in northeastern India, is famous for its living bridges. The people of these villages (Nongriat, Laitkynshew and others) are isolated from the rest of the world as they live in deep valleys which can only be reached by arduous trek. Over hundreds of years the people in Cherrapunji have developed techniques for growing roots of trees into bridges. They plant the strangler fig trees on both sides of the river and once they grow they use guides such as bamboo poles or string for the roots to grow around them. The process takes 10 to 15 years and the bridges typically last hundreds of years, the oldest ones in use being over 500 years old.
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Kobuk Sand Dunes – A desert in Alaska

By Anthony RemboldtOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Kobuk Valley National Park in northwestern Alaska 25 miles (40 km) north of the Arctic Circle is noted for the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes and caribou migration routes. No roads lead to the park. People typically get there by chartered air taxi. Three sets of sand dune fields are located on the south side of the Kobuk River. The Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Little Kobuk Sand Dunes and the Hunt River Dunes are remnants of dune fields that covered as many as 200,000 acres immediately after the retreat of Pleistocene glaciation. A combination of out-wash deposits from the glaciers and strong winds created the field, which is now mostly covered by forest and tundra.
info: Wikipedia
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Zipwire ride from Spain to Portugal

David Jarman, the British creator of Limit Zero, set up and created a zipwire ride connecting the Spanish village of Sanlúcar de Guadiana with Alcoutim, across the Guardiana River in Portugal.
Visitors are provided a unique experience crossing over the River Guadiana from Spain to Portugal. Along the 720 meters joining the two countries, users cross over the river at speeds between 70 and 80 kilometers per hour, literally flying through time and gaining one hour because of the time zone change between both countries.
Participants, when they reach the end of the zip line in Portugal, they walk to the Alcoutim jetty where they are ferried back across the river to Spain.

Dust devils

A dust devil in Arizona – By NASA (NASA web page & source file) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A dust devil is a strong relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from half a meter wide and a few meters tall to more than 10 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall. Dust devils are usually harmless, but can on rare occasions grow large enough to pose a threat to both people and property. Dust devils form when hot air near the surface rises quickly through a small pocket of cooler, low-pressure air above it. A fully formed dust devil is a funnel-like chimney through which hot air moves, both upwards and in a circle. As the hot air rises, it cools, loses its buoyancy and eventually ceases to rise.
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Grüner See – An alpine park that turns into a lake in summer

By Herzi Pinki (Own work) [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

Grüner See (Green Lake) is a lake in Styria, Austria, surrounded by the Hochschwab Mountains and forests. The name “Green Lake” originated because of its emerald-green water. During winter, the lake is only 1–2 m (3–7 ft) deep and the surrounding area is used as a county park. However, in spring, when the temperature rises and snow melts, the basin of land below the mountains fills with water. The lake reaches its maximum depth of around 12 m (39 ft). The waters are at their highest in June when it becomes a destination for divers keen to explore the rare phenomenon. A bridge and a bench could also be found underwater, as well as trails and trees. Info WIKIPEDIA Continue reading Grüner See – An alpine park that turns into a lake in summer