Nature-inspired ceramics by Heesoo Lee

Artist Heesoo Lee uses multi-layered techniques to create intricate ceramic vessels that look like colorful  forests.
“The artist begins by forming each tree individually, starting with the closest and largest trees as she builds perspective by filling in the background with progressively smaller trunks, each of which is individually formed with a clay coil. Next, for her non-wintry pieces, each leaf is individually formed and applied to create the dense foliage that further increases the sense of depth on the surface of her ceramics. After an initial firing, Lee applies colored details using painted underglaze, which must be applied without overlapping different glazes to prevent discoloration after firing. Lastly, she chooses from a range of finishing glazes, selected depending on the desired effect, like an icy blue vernal pool or clearly defined leaves.”

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Fanciful photo-manipulations by Boby Atmajaya

Boby Atmajaya creates stunning dream worlds where everything is possible through the unexpected and unique imagery combinations and photo manipulations.

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Pretty bye bye

A post shared by Boby Atmajaya (@flecce_) on

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Museum of the Moon

Museum of the Moon is a new touring artwork by UK artist Luke Jerram. Measuring seven meters in diameter, the moon features 120dpi detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface. At an approximate scale of 1:500,000, each centimeter of the internally lit spherical sculpture represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The installation is a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by BAFTA and Ivor Novello award winning composer Dan Jones. Each venue also programs their own series lunar inspired events beneath the moon.

Gems of the ocean: Glass fishing floats

By User:Jgrimmer – Photo taken by original uploader, Public Domain, Link

Glass fishing floats were once used by fishermen in many parts of the world to keep the nets from sinking. Though the floats are often associated with Japan, they were invented in Norway in 1842. Christopher Faye, a Norwegian merchant from Bergen, is credited with their invention and many of them can still be found in local boathouses. From the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s, floats were made of colorful blown glass. These glass floats are no longer used by fishermen, but many of them are still afloat in the world’s oceans, primarily the Pacific.
Although the number of glass floats is decreasing steadily, occasional storms or certain tidal conditions can bring them ashore. They most often end up on the beaches of Alaska, Washington or Oregon in the United States, Taiwan or Canada.
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Origami Made Of Plants by Inori

Twitter user Inori makes little animals and stunning figurines out of all kinds of plants and flowers. In the videos below see her in action, creating a girl with a red kimono out of camellia flowers and ballerinas with white clovers.

Night of the Radishes

By AlejandroLinaresGarcia [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons

The Night of the Radishes is an annual event in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico, dedicated to the carving of oversized radishes to create scenes that compete for prizes in various categories. The event has its origins in the colonial period when radishes were introduced by the Spanish. Oaxaca has a long wood carving tradition and farmers began carving radishes into figures as a way to attract customers’ attention at the Christmas market, which was held in the main square on December 23. In 1897, the city created the formal competition. As the city has grown, the city has had to dedicate land to the growing of the radishes used for the event, supervising their growth and distribution to competitors.
info wikipedia
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