Norwegian architecture taken out of fairy tales

Borgund Stave Church

It was built sometime between 1180 and 1250 AD with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards or staves. The four corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting on a stone foundation. The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall. (image source)

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The White Temple in Thailand

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The original Wat Rong Khun or the White Temple by the end of the 20th century, was in a bad state of repair. Funds were not available for renovation. Chalermchai Kositpipat, a local artist from Chiang Rai, decided to completely rebuild the temple and fund the project with his own money.
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Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park

Sunga Park works in South Korea as a mural wallpaper designer. The architectural watercolors selection features buildings from cities around the world, including London, Paris, Busan, Venice, and Oxford. The buildings are painted in a fade out manner that gives them a floating essence and leaves imagination to fill in the rest.

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Kofun: keyhole tombs of Japan

Kofun are megalithic tombs for rulers in Japan, constructed between the early 3rd century and early 7th century. The most common type of kofun has a shape of a keyhole, having one square end and one circular end, when looked down upon from above. The funeral chamber was located beneath the round part and consisted of a group of megaliths.

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