Hashima, the Battleship Island

By Flickr user: kntrty https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/ – Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/3720075234/, CC BY 2.0, Link

Hashima Island , commonly called Gunkanjima (meaning Battleship Island), is an abandoned island lying about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the city of Nagasaki, in southern Japan. The island’s most notable features are its abandoned concrete buildings, undisturbed except by nature, and the surrounding sea wall. The  island established in 1887 during the industrialization of Japan and was known for its undersea coal mines. In 1974, with the coal reserves nearing depletion, the mine was closed and all of the residents departed soon after,  Interest in the island re-emerged in the 2000s on account of its undisturbed historic ruins, and it gradually became a tourist attraction. Certain collapsed exterior walls have since been restored, and travel to Hashima was re-opened to tourists in  2009. While the island is a symbol of the rapid industrialization of Japan, it is also a reminder of its history as a site of forced labor prior to and during the Second World War.
info: wikipedia

By Hisagi (氷鷺) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

By Σ64Own work, CC BY 3.0, Link

By NsxblnOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

By Jordy MeowOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

By ja:利用者:Citrinitasja:画像:Hasima.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

By Flickr user: kntrty https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/ – Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kntrty/3720075234/, CC BY 2.0, Link

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eMORFES

A photo blog focused on the unique things of the world, exploring a number of different subjects such as art, photography, architecture and travel.

3 thoughts on “Hashima, the Battleship Island”

  1. Preziose immagini di luoghi lontani e abbandonati….
    Sempre speciali gli articoli contenuti nelle tue belle pagine
    Buon fine settimana e un saluto,silvia

  2. The images of this abandoned island are magnificent. As you put it, it is a true reminder of how fleeting wealth can be. Many times it is reduced to rubble. Anyway, it attracts a lot of attention and tourism takes advantage of it.

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