Virga – rain that doesn’t reach the ground

By Simon Eugster (talk · contribs) – Self-photographed, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

In meteorology, a virga is rain falling from a cloud that evaporates before reaching the ground. At high altitudes the precipitation falls mainly as ice crystals before melting and finally evaporating. The phenomenon is very common in deserts, where low humidity and high temperatures can cause rain to evaporate shortly after being released by clouds. You might see virga in the U.S. West and above the Canadian Prairies, in the Middle East, Australia and North Africa.

This photography has been taken on July 14th, 2016, over the Gulf of Fréjus (French Riviera), at sunset time. The rain is lighted by the sunset (coming from the left of the view) and goes back to vapor before it can reach the sea. – By Philippe MaurissetOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Public Domain, Link

Sunset and virga in Elko, Nevada – By FamartinOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Some Virga clouds (Cumulus or Altocumulus) taken in Tyresta – By Simon A. EugsterOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Virga during sunset in Elko, Nevada – By FamartinOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

By Simon A. EugsterOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Virga over the Napa-Sonoma Marsh in California  – By MsannakovalOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Snow Virga captured just before sunrise in Omaha, NE – By Stephen Richart(Lord138 (talk)) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Public Domain, Link

By Greg Willis from Denver, CO, usa – Round Tower and Virga, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link

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