When cable lines lined city skies

The Old Stockholm telephone tower (Swedish: Telefontornet ) was a metallic structure built to connect approximately 5,500 telephone lines in the Swedish capital of Stockholm. Constructed in 1887, the tower was damaged by a fire in 1952 and demolished the following year.

See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

View of a lineman working on power or telephone lines at an intersection in Pratt, Kansas, 1911

Image source: Kansas Historical Society

A postcard of Broadway, north from Cortlandt and Maiden Lane, New York City, c. 1885–87.

See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Power and telephone lines sagging after heavy ice storm.

Image source: NOAA Photo Library

The railway station at Pearl Street, Boston, Massachusetts, after a hurricane in January 1881.

Image source: Tekniska museet

On a telegraph building at Skeppsbron, Stockholm, 1895.

Image source: Tekniska museet

Telephone pole line construction in New York, c. 1903

via IEEE Global History Network

Telephone wires on roof, Stockholm, Sweden, between 1890 and 1900.

Image source: Tekniska museet

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eMORFES

A photo blog focused on the unique things of the world, exploring a number of different subjects such as art, photography, architecture and travel.

3 thoughts on “When cable lines lined city skies”

  1. Wow! I’ve seen those along railroad tracks and knew that each line represented a single long-distance line between cities (why long-distance rates were so high). Now, all that can fit in a single fiber-optic line (but long distance rates are STILL high)! lol Great photos though!

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