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art design & oddities

Posts tagged “eco

Rainbow Eucalyptus

Rainbow-Eucalyptus-Tree-13Photo: Allpe Engineering and Environment

Eucalyptus deglupta, commonly known as the rainbow eucalyptus, is cultivated as an ornamental tree, for planting in tropical and subtropical climate gardens and parks. The unique multi-hued bark is the most distinctive feature of the tree. Patches of outer bark are shed annually at different times, showing a bright green inner bark. This then darkens and matures to give blue, purple, orange and then maroon tones.

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Ghoramara – On The Shore of a Vanishing Island

Ghoramara--vanishing-island-10

The island of Ghoramara is located on a delta region in West Bengal, India. A rise in sea levels has washed away more than 50% of Ghoramara island since the 1980s, prompting two-thirds of its population to leave. The continually receding shore and vanishing vegetation leave behind a coast of sediment holding an ironic beauty of its own amid the increasingly barren shores. Daesung Lee, an international photojournalist, situated villagers on the shore and took portraits of them in juxtaposition with the beauty of the vanishing island.

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The Monkey Orchid

monkey orchid 1Image: Columbus GV Team

These rare primate-esque flowers are formally known as Dracula simia. They  only grow in the cloud forests of southeastern Ecuador and Peru at elevations of 1,000-2,000 meters on the side of mountains. In the scientific name, “simia” refers to the monkey face and “Dracula” refers to the two long spurs that hang down, almost like fangs.

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The Bizzare Landscape of Socotra Island

socotra-desert-rosePhoto: Mark W. Moffett

An island off the coast of Yemen in the Indian Ocean, Socotra is home to hundreds of plants found nowhere else on earth like the Dragon’s Blood Tree and Desert Rose looking like a blooming elephant leg. There are almost no roads on the island, which is also home to a collection of caves and a number of shipwrecks.

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The Floating Forest

abandoned-ship-ss-ayrfield-floating-forestPhoto: Bruce Hood

The SS Ayrfield (originally launched as SS Corrimal) was built in 1911. During World War II was used to transport supplies to American troops in the Pacific. It was sold in 1950 and operated as a collier on the sixty-miler run between Newcastle and Sydney, until 1972 that the ship was brought to the Homebush Bay, its final resting place.
More than 100 years since its launch nature has taken over, turning the ship into a beautiful little floating forest.

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B & W Documentary Photography by Gustavo Jononovich

Documentary-Photography-Gustavo-Jononovich

A series of Photography on oil pollution in the Ecuadorian jungle by Argentinian photographer Gustavo Jononovich.
Richland is his long-term documentary project  about the over-exploitation of the natural resources in Latin America and the resulting long-term negative effects, both human and environmental.

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Photography – Unique Forests

Crooked Forest, Poland

This grove of approximately 400 pines was planted around 1930, when its location was still within the German province of Pomerania. It is generally believed that some form of human tool or technique was used to make the trees grow this way, but the method and motive are not currently known.

crooked-forest-poland-1

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Human Nests by Jayson Fann

Human-Nests-Jayson-Fann

Artist Jayson Fann is a California resident who creates spirit nests for humans and helps to run the amazing Big Sur Spirit Garden along the Pacific Coast. Each nest is an interactive and functional art sculpture made from tree branches that are harvested from local forests and is large enough to accommodate up to eight people.

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Natural Swimming Pools

Hidden Beach on Marieta Islands, Mexico

hidden-beach-marieta-islands-mexico-1

hidden-beach-marieta-islands-mexico-2Image credit

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Lifes of Grass | Mathilde Roussel

Made of a compacted growing medium, these suspended sculptures by Mathilde Roussel are planted with grass seeds and allowed to transform over time, the grass sprouting and growing.

“Through these anthropomorphic and organic sculptures made of soil and wheat grass seeds, I strive to show that food, it’s origin, it’s transport, has an impact on us beyond it’s taste. The power inside it affects every organ of our body. Observing nature and being aware of what and how we eat makes us more sensitive to food cycles in the world – of abundance, of famine – and allows us to be physically, intellectually and spiritually connected to a global reality.”

In this series of photos, notice how she shows the slow transformation of the suspended sculptures.

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Scientific Textbook Illustrations by Josh Keyes

Josh Keyes ‘s style is reminiscent of the diagrammatic vocabulary found in scientific textbook illustrations that often express through a detached and clinical viewpoint an empirical representation of the natural world. Keyes’ work is a hybrid of eco-surrealism and dystopian folktales that express a concern for our time and the Earth’s future.

He was born in Tacoma, Washington. He received a BFA in 1992 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA in 1998 from Yale University. Keyes currently lives and works in Portland Oregon.

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Recycled Bicycle Chain Chandeliers

Carolina Fontoura Alzaga, a Mexican multidisciplinary artist, takes old bike parts and turns them into shimmering chandeliers. Her series of Victorian-era chandelier sculptures is called “Connect”.  These Subversive objects challenge the aesthetics of wealth by visually contrasting the classic elegance of the candelabrum with the new-found elegance of discarded, mechanical bicycle parts.

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The Waitomo Glowworm Caves

The breathtaking limestone caves in Waitomo, New Zealand, are home to hundreds of thousands of the beetles – which light up the caverns like bright blue stars. The caves are a perfect breeding ground for glow-worms, which can only survive in very dark, damp places where their light can be seen.
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Photography: Wildlife Crossings

Wildlife crossings are structures that allow animals to cross human-made barriers safely. They may include: underpass tunnels, viaducts, and overpasses (mainly for large or herd-type animals), fish ladders and green roofs (for butterflies and birds). Wildlife crossings are a practice in habitat conservation, allowing connections or re-connections between habitats, combating habitat fragmentation. They also assist in avoiding collisions between vehicles and animals, which in addition to killing or injuring wildlife may cause injury to humans and property damage.

Wildlife Overpass, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada. (Image source)

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Kaindy Lake Sunken Forest

Image source

Kaindy Lake is an idyllic mountain lake in Kazakhstan. The lake was formed after an earthquake in 1911, which caused a major landslide, effectively creating a natural dam. Successively, rainwater filled the valley and created the lake.

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Bee Hotels for Solitary Bees

Solitary bees do not live within a hive with a queen. There are males and females. A fertilized female makes a nest in wood or stone and bored into the wood in order to construct a nursery.

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Photography: Africa from the air

Martin Harvey‘s aerial photos of landscapes and wildlife in Africa.

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Waterfall Ice Climbing

Waterfall Ice  Climbing

During the winter some waterfalls freeze solid. Where they once rushed roaring water, they now stand frozen, white and silent. This oxymoron of a motionless falls is an ice climber’s dream.

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Dead Vlei: Namibia’s Tree Graveyard

Dead Vlei: Namibia's Tree Graveyard

Photo: John Freeman

Dead Vlei means dead marsh or lake. It is the name of an awe-inspiring white clay pan situated in the salt pan of Sossusvlei,  Namibia. The clay pan was formed after rainfall, when the Tsauchab river flooded, creating temporary shallow pools where the abundance of water allowed camel thorn trees to grow. When the climate changed, drought hit the area, and sand dunes encroached on the pan, which blocked the river from the area. The trees died, as there no longer was enough water to survive. They have remained in these eerie positions for over 900 years.

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Sailing in a strawberry milkshake

Sailing in a strawberry milkshake_Lake Retba

Lake Retba, which runs through Senegal, West Africa, gets its color from an unusually high salt content—in some up to 40-percent! Microbiologist Michael Danson says that the water gets its candy-colored hue from the salt-loving organism Dunaliella salina (an algae). “They produce a red pigment that absorbs and uses the energy of sunlight to create more energy, turning the water pink,” he told the Daily Mail.

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Crescent Lake: an oasis in the Gobi desert

crescent-lake-desert-oasis-dunhuang-china

About 6 kilometers south of Dunhuang city in China, and surrounded by the Echoing-Sand Mountain, Crescent Lake can be called a natural wonder in the Gobi Desert. Actually, it resembles a crescent fallen down into the desert. Crescent Lake sits on the edge of an ancient city that once saw traders embark on their journey along the Silk Road to the West. Since the 1960′s  the depth of the lake continually declined, but in 2006 the local government with help of the central government started to fill the lake and restore its depth. Its depth and size have been growing yearly since then.

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Greta Oto – The Transparent Butterfly

glasswing butterfly

Butterflies in general are fragile, so fragile that the color in them would literally rub off on your hands if you stroked their wings. Butterflies of the species Greta Oto are commonly called clearwings or glasswings and come from Central America. The tissues of their wings look like glass thus giving them the transparent wings. They have dispensed with the growth of colored scales that normally cover the wings of butterflies and moths. Probably a way to hide from predators.

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Amazon Rainforest Photography

Amazonian-Sunset

Photo credit

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The Biodiversity Project

the-biodiversity-project

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore has a mission: to shoot with a camera Earth’s endangered species in a studio setting, so that human viewers are forced to confront exactly who’s going extinct face-to-face. More than 1,800 species have been photographed to date, with more to come.

You can see many more of Joel’s photos at the Biodiversity Project, where you can purchase affordable prints of these photos.

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