Tag Archives: Arts and Entertainment

Imaginative mixed media art by Sarah Illenberger

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Sarah Illenberger is a multi-media artist  based in Berlin working at the intersection of art, graphic design, and photography. With a focus on analog craftwork using everyday items, Sarah is renowned for creating vivid, witty images that open up new perspectives on seemingly familiar subjects.

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Zipper Installations by Jun Kitagawa

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Japanese artist Jun Kitagawa installs zippers in buildings, on walls, and even in public ponds, around Japan. With his zippers, either painted on walls or sculpted , he intents to give viewers a more intimate look into the world we interact with every day through a familiar object.

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Stop:watch – reinventing everyday objects

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Dutch illustrator Tineke Meirink with her series Stop:Watch hopes to make people realize that “everything has its beauty and that it is just more fun to take a closer look.”
Stop:watch is about taking a closer look. To stop and watch. Tineke takes photos of apparently uninteresting items  and adds a minimal illustration digitally. That way these photos get a whole different meaning, they come to life.

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Surreal Digital Art by Ben Goossens

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Ben Goossens worked for 35 years in his native Belgium as an ad agency art director. After retiring, Goossen’s turned to creating photo montages with a distinctive Surrealism style reminiscent of his fellow countryman, René Magritte.
Goossens’ images have received awards in a number of prestigious international photography competitions including Gold and Silver medals at the Trierenberg Super Circuit, the world’s largest annual photography salon. His composite photos are remarkable for their seamless yet painterly renderings of Surrealism dreamscapes.

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Representations: Everyday Objects as Drawings

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Visual artist Cynthia Greig collects everyday objects and whitewashes them with ordinary house paint to devoid them of color or label. Then draws directly onto their surfaces with charcoal to create visual hybrids that appear to vacillate between drawing and photography, black-and-white and color. No digital manipulation is involved, but the camera’s monocular point of view is imperative.

My series of photographs, Representations, explores the concept of photographic truth and its correspondence to perceived reality. As a kind of playful homage to William Henry Fox Talbot’s treatise, The Pencil of Nature, the images combine color photography and drawing to create what I like to call photographic documents of three-dimensional drawings.

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